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I thought, if anything, they'd go with a lowercase "i" because the uppercase "I" can look like a lowercase "L" and maybe that's slightly weird.

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There are a slew of sites and apps to help singles find love and, for the most part, they work, according to Consumer Reports.

About one-in-five 18- to 24-year olds (22%) now report using mobile dating apps; in 2013, only 5% reported doing so.

Anybody building a site in that requires users to create accounts is going to face this language challenge. As in, "sign" is a verb (describes an action) and "sign up" is a verb plus a complement — participial phrase, best I can tell. My best guess before looking into this was that "signup" isn't even a word at all, and more of a lazy internet mistake. It's either "front-end" (a compound adjective as in a front-end developer), or "front end" (as in, "Your job is to work on the front end."). The fact that both "sign up" and "signup" are both legit words/phrases makes this a little tricky. The only thing weird about Twitter's approach here is the capitalization of "Up" and the lowercase "in." Twitter seems giant enough that they must have thought of this and decided this intentionally, so I'd love to understand why because it looks like a mistake to my eyes.

You'll probably have this language strewed across your entire site, from prominent calls-to-action in your homepage hero, to persistent header buttons, to your documentation. Having a verbal phrase as a button seems like a solid choice, but I wouldn't call it wrong to have a button that said "Signup" since the button presumably links directly to a form in which you can sign up and that's the correct noun for it. Twitter goes with "Sign Up" and "Log in." We haven't even talked about the difference between "Log in" and "Login," but the difference is very much the same. Facebook, like Twitter, goes with "Sign Up" and "Log In." Google goes with "Sign in" and "Create account." It's not terribly rare to see companies use the "Create" verb.

Zoom uses "SIGN IN" and "SIGN UP" with the use of all-caps giving a pass on having to decide which words are capitalized.

Figma goes the "Sign In" and "Sign up" route, almost having symmetry — but what's up with the mismatched capitalization?

The purpose of the fake messages is to direct you to a dating site of there choice, after you click on ay of the links on the chat page.

In this particular case you are sent to when you click on the links.

With some light internet grammar research, the term "sign up" is a verbal phrase. Seems to me it wouldn't be wrong to call a form that collects a user's name and email address a "signup form." "Sign-up" is almost definitely wrong, as it's not a compound word or compound adjective.

As in, "Go up the hallway past the water fountain and you'll see the signup on the wall." Which could certainly be a digital thing as well.

Using computer programming they can even determine your IP location and with geographical information they can actually make it appear as if that girl in the video knows where you are located through this information.

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