Herb alpert the dating game

Alpert later commented that the Sol Lake composition “Mexican Shuffle” “opened a new door for me.” That passageway meant the loss of the Tijuana Brass‘ practically forced mariachi style and the rise of Alpert‘s approach in arranging familiar melodies in fresh, creative settings.Nowhere would this stylistic progression be as pronounced as in the horn-driven updates of several then-concurrent chart hits.Original Release Date: 1964 Re-issue Date: 2015 Herb Alpert was still using an array of So Cal studio all-stars as his Tijuana Brass when South of the Border (1964) began to restore the combo’s good name after the modest Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, Vol.

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Also, Alpert was just getting the TJB concept underway; the textures are leaner, the productions less polished, and the accent is more consciously on a Mexican mariachi ambience — the relatively square rhythms, the mandolins, the mournful, wistful siesta feeling — than the records down the road.

The hit title track (originally a tune called “Twinkle Star”!

Original Release Date: 1963 Re-issue Date: 2015 The follow-up LP to The Lonely Bull, in the great tradition of follow-ups, tries to duplicate its appeal right off the bat with another leadoff track featuring bullfight sounds and an authentic bullring tune, “The Great Manolete.” Alpert is beginning to expand his reach beyond Baja, California without losing the ambience of “The Lonely Bull,” sharpening his skills as a producer and exploring other moods and rhythms.

In doing so, he comes up with the greatest stripper record this side of David Rose, “Swinger from Seville,” a mocking version of Leonard Bernstein‘s “America” to a lively guajira beat in a wild simulated nightclub, and covers of ’60s standards like “More” and “Spanish Harlem.” He also receives some more haunting contributions from Sol Lake, including the wistful “Winds of Barcelona” (later recorded by Wes Montgomery) and a marvelously produced, Spanish-tinged tone poem, “Marching Through Madrid.” Though released in 1963, this record didn’t really start selling until 1966, when TJB albums were monopolizing the upper reaches of the charts en masse.

Not bad, considering the market was being heavily infiltrated, if not practically dominated by the British Invasion.

With Whipped Cream & Other Delights (1965), they would take that momentum to new heights — including three Grammy Awards alone for the update of the Bobby Scott and Ric Marlow-penned theme to Shelagh Delaney’s play of the same name, “A Taste of Honey.” The remainder of the material on the dozen-song album was chosen with food as the underlying thematic motif.Pisano, who debuted as a composer on Going Places, comes up with a memorably whistleable song, “So What’s New,” and the rest of Alpert‘s songwriting brigade (Ervan Coleman, Julius Wechter, and Sol Lake) chime in with some lively, catchy tunes.There is also an assortment of pop, film, and Broadway standards of the day, all impeccably arranged by Alpert, whose production instincts grew sharper and surer with every release. (Standing Room Only), referring to the Tijuana Brass’ string of sold-out concerts, is an accurate title, for this LP is about a seven-piece band loaded with experienced jazzers who groove and swing together to a greater degree than on their previous albums.Factory’s Herb Alpert Signature Series and boasts remarkably improved sound.] Original Release Date: 1965 Re-issue Date: 2015 Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass were rolling right down the middle of the American pop scene like a locomotive in 1966 — and this album captures them at the peak of their exuberance.By now, there really was a live, touring edition of the Tijuana Brass, and there was an easily identifiable TJB sound, with its strummed Latin American guitars, twin trumpet leads, delicate marimba or vibes (played by Julius Wechter of Baja Marimba Band fame in the studio), and strong grooves rooted in Latin American music, jazz, and rock.At the age of eight, he was drawn to the trumpet in a music appreciation class in his elementary school.

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