Dating velox paper

As time passes this silver tends to migrate to the surface of the print creating tell-tale metallic patches.Observing this shiny crust, no mater what the color, is a quick and sure way of telling if you are looking at a real photo.The presence of a photographers name is not a definite indication of when a card was made or even who made it.

dating velox paper-86

This practice was only cost effective on cards printed in large numbers; individuals and small photo studios could rarely afford to do so. While many amateur photographers numbered their cards this was most often done by larger studios.

Sometimes a photographer might expose a logo onto the image or hand stamp a name to the back of the card. Numbering was an essential way of keeping tract of large inventory.

At other times a studio might buy out the negative inventory of older photographers and reprinted their images under the current studio name.

This could go on for generations, and it is not uncommon to find the same photograph attributed to three different artists.

The tonalities of photos are completely continuous to the eye producing true greys, for they are created by the reaction of individual photosensitive molecules to light rather than the transfer of ink from a plate.

In printed images the grey areas are usually made up of black marks that are spaced to create the optical illusion of greys.

When no postmark is available, the type of materials used can often aid in narrowing down the years it may have been produced in.

This too is not foolproof for many publishers had large stocks of photo papers using them for decades after they stopped being manufactured.

While today this would lead to lawsuits, copyright was uncommon and rarely enforced at the turn of the 20th century.

Today there are many real photo postcards of unknown origin and date.

But even collotypes will exhibit a discernible grain when magnified.

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