About dating violence

Furthermore, local programs (not only those located in rural communities) are highly interested in developing and implementing peer advocacy models.

about dating violence-13

Other identified gaps are present in rural programs.

Rural programs report that transportation, parental consent, and the lack of teen-specific services often prevent youth from engaging services.

The effect of teen dating violence on physical health, mental health, and educational outcomes is significant.

Youth victims of dating violence are more likely to experience depression and anxiety symptoms, engage in unhealthy behaviors like using tobacco, drugs and alcohol, exhibit antisocial behaviors, and think about suicide.

Unfortunately, teen dating violence—the type of intimate partner violence that occurs between two young people who are, or who were once in, an intimate relationship—is a serious problem in the United States.

A national survey found that ten percent of teens, female and male, had been the victims of physical dating violence within the past year and can increase the risk of physical injury, poor academic performance, binge drinking, suicide attempts, unhealthy sexual behaviors, substance abuse, negative body image and self-esteem, and violence in future relationships.

Youth also report concerns that the abuse will be disclosed to their parents and/or Child Protective Services, or that their partners will be notified, thus subjecting them to more abuse.

These are important gaps which could benefit from additional resource development and technical assistance.

These forms of abuse are often challenging to identify because they are extremely normalized in society and at the same time, inherently more private.

Tags: , ,